PE Systems

Polyethylene (PE) pipe manufacture commenced in Australia in the 1950’s with small diameter pipes used for rural, irrigation and industrial applications. Since then, PE use and the number of applications for PE pipes has grown enormously, due to its versatility and the advantages it offers over iron, steel and cement pipe systems.

PE Systems Information


Where and how can polyethylene pipes be used?

PE pipe is used for a wide variety of applications including drinking water service, rural irrigation and stock watering; mining, slurry and gas lines; and, sewerage and drainage systems.

The unique properties of PE pipe make it ideal for use when trenchless technology is being used to install or rehabilitate pipe systems. Trenchless technology is a common technique used to avoid the need for open trenches and reduce the disturbance to the public and the environment.


PE products come in a range of grades suitable for different applications.

PE 100 – The latest generation polyethylene pipe grade has higher strength and toughness than earlier generation materials. PE 100 has an MRS of 10.0MPa at 20°C. PE 100 is available in various Chlorine Classification (CC) grades as noted in PIPA POP018 – Polyethylene Drinking Water Pipes in Contact with Chlorine and Chloramine Disinfectants.

HDPE – High-density polyethylene is used in the production of polyethylene conduits.

LDPE – Low density polyethylene has high flexibility and retention of properties at low temperatures. The main applications of LDPE are in micro irrigation, low pressure drip irrigation, rural irrigation and stock watering applications.


PE pressure pipes are designated by their outside diameter or DN.

For water and other general pressure applications, the maximum allowable operating pressure (MAOP) with a minimum service coefficient is designated by the pressure rating or PN. The SDR of a PE pipe refers to its ‘Standard Dimension Ratio’ which describes the geometry of the pipe and is the ratio of the outside diameter and the minimum wall thickness. Pipes with a higher SDR have a thinner wall than pipes with a low SDR. The SDR can be related to the MAOP using the material MRS and the service coefficient appropriate for the application.

Product Support

Need some help? View our Product Support area for downloads, installations and jointing procedures.